Have you decided you’ve spent long enough in your career, and now you’re looking for a new business venture? Whatever your reason for wanting to open a coffee shop, you’ll need to make some important preparations found in the following guide first.

Brewing up a storm.

There’s never been a better time to go ahead with a coffee shop business. In the past decade, London alone has seen a 700% surge in the number of independent coffee shops lining its streets. The success of individual coffee start-ups continued to soar even through lockdown, with mobile entrepreneurs keeping the nation fuelled at hospitals and homes alike. Simply put, people will always need coffee.

Create a plan.

You’ll need to cover a few key points in a comprehensive plan for your café. Make sure you consider:

  • The whole industry, and where you’ll fit in – will you be selling luxury coffee made from premium, single-origin beans, or could you see your shop being a quick fix for local commuters? Undertake thorough market research to find your niche and stick to it to build a strong association with your brand.
  • Any local competitors – if you’re opening on a busy high street already lined with coffee chains, think twice before attempting to offer a similar service. Brainstorm creatively and find opportunities to start something refreshing and exciting.
  • Your marketing strategy – this includes how you plan to price your drinks, and which other items you decide to add to your menu. If you have any ideas for meal deals or other promotions, include them here too.
  • Your finances – this includes choosing your location wisely, as it could be more cost-effective to move away to start your business. When it comes to buying a coffee machine, a more expensive, quality espresso machine could be a wise investment, saving you future maintenance costs.

Interior design.

Your ambience and internal environment will be hugely influential in determining how long your customers stay and how likely they will be to return.

Why not browse for contemporary hospitality furniture designed to offer practicality with a sleek, understated feel? The more comfortable your customers feel, the more relaxed they’re likely to be – and that could encourage more spending.

The legal stuff.

You’ll need to register your coffee shop as a limited company, as you’ll gain credibility when it comes to singing leases and dealing with banks. You’ll also need to find commercial insurance to cover your property, your staff, and your customers – not forgetting health and safety procedures and paperwork.

Going ahead with an independent coffee shop start-up could be incredibly rewarding, but it’s critical to follow a plan and not rush into any major decisions. Good luck!

 

Source